Victorian Bullshit and Co.

Miscellaneous bits of History, Literature, Victorians, and Art.

Napoleon III overlooks his son posing for a photography with his pony, 1860s.

Two lovely but faint photographs of the Comtesse de Castiglione in a shocking state of undress.

Julia Margaret Cameron and her six children, Hardinge, Henry, Eugene, Julia, Charles, and Ewen, c. 1854. 
Empress Eugenie and her court, 1856.

Alfred Tennyson’s sons Lionel (left) and Hallam photographed by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1864.

Cameron and Tennyson were friends and neighbors, and Cameron was one of the few women Tennyson felt comfortable enough with to call her by her first name. Thus, it is no surprise that she used Tennyson’s sons for some of her first photographic experiments. At this time, Cameron was still refining her techniques for developing photographs, as seen in the prominent “pour marks” that occur in these photos. These wavy white lines come from the liquid that is poured on the glass negatives during the development process, and these imperfections are much less noticeable in Cameron’s later work.

Julia Jackson (the mother of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell) photographed by her aunt, Julia Margaret Cameron.

Lady Ottoline Morrell, 1926.

(Source: npg.org.uk)

La Comtesse de Castiglione, photographed by Pierre-Louis Pierson, 1860s.
Lady Ottoline Morrell, 1926.

La Comtesse de Castiglione, photographed by Pierre-Louis Pierson, 1860s.

(Source: metmuseum.org)