Victorian Bullshit and Co.

Miscellaneous bits of Literature, Victorians, History, and Art.

funeral-wreaths:

Left to right: Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Fanny Cornforth and William Michael Rossetti, at Tudor House, Chelsea, c. 1863

funeral-wreaths:

Left to right: Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Fanny Cornforth and William Michael Rossetti, at Tudor House, Chelsea, c. 1863

(via thedailyvictorian)

Queen Victoria’s children at Balmoral Castle, photographed by Roger Fenton, 1856.

Princess Helena and Princess Louise, Prince Alfred, and Victoria, Princess Royal and Princess Alice. 

(Source: royalcollection.org.uk)

Julia Margaret Cameron and her son, Henry Herschel Hay Cameron, circa 1867.
Henry, Cameron’s youngest son, followed in his mother’s footsteps and became a professional photographer.

Aubrey Beardsley’s illustrations to Alexander Pope’s The Rape of the Lock, 1896.

The Billet-doux ~ The Morning Dream ~ The Toilette ~ The Baron’s Prayer ~ The Barge ~ The Rape of the Lock ~ The Cave of Spleen ~ The Battle of the Beaux and Belles ~ The New Star

bleuroses:

Lady Ottoline

bleuroses:

Lady Ottoline

(via ghost-lilies)

Julia Margaret Cameron’s illustrations to The May Queen by Alfred Tennyson, 1875.

These three photographs are part of Illustrations to Tennyson’s Idylls of the King and Other Poems, Vol. 2. While all the illustrations in the first volume are to Idylls of the King, the second volume includes illustrations to other Tennyson Poems such as The May Queen, The Princess, Mariana, and Maud, as well as four more illustrations to Idylls of the King. 

The May Queen is portrayed by a woman named Emily Peacock, and the man in the second photograph is in fact Alfred Tennyson’s youngest son, Lionel. 

The text below each photograph is a facsimile of Cameron’s handwriting. The photographs are also accompanied by a handwritten excerpt of the poem on facing pages. The above text reads:

"For I’m to be queen o’ the May Mother"
"I’m to be queen o’ the May"

"He though of that sharp look mother I gave him yesterday
They call me cruel hearted I care not what they say”

"So now I think my time is near. I trust it is. I know"
"The blessed music went that way my soul will have to go"

(Source: hrc.contentdm.oclc.org)

Princess Louise, one of Queen Victoria’s daughters, photographed by John Jabez Edwin Mayall, 1863.

(Source: royalcollection.org.uk)

Daniel Maclise’s illustrations to Leonora, translated by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1847. 

About fifteen years before she took up a camera, renowned photographer Julia Margaret Cameron published a translation of Gottfried August Bürger’s 1773 poem, Leonora. It was illustrated by Daniel Maclise, the well know Victorian artist and friend of Charles Dickens.

In the poem, Leonora curses God when she learns that her fiancé, William, has died in war. Later that night, William returns on horseback and asks Leonora to ride with him to their nuptial bed. A feverish ride takes them to a graveyard, and when her beloved William transforms into a skeleton, Leonora discovers that her nuptial bed is in fact her grave. 

Though the poem was frequently translated into English by famous poets such as Sir Walter Scott and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Cameron claimed that her translation was much more faithful to the original German version. It was published in a rather elaborate edition that is entirely typeset in Gothic blackletter to complement Maclise’s illustrations. 

You can see a facsimile of the original edition here

Queen Victoria’s children photographed by Roger Fenton in Tableaux of the Seasons, 1854.

Princess Alice is portraying spring, Victoria, Princess Royal and Prince Arthur are portraying summer, Prince Alfred is portraying Autumn, and Princess Louise and Albert, Prince of Wales, are portraying winter. The last tableau shows all the seasons assembled and presided over by Princess Helena as the Spirit Empress.  

(Source: royalcollection.org.uk)

A hand-colored carte-de-visite of Charles Dickens, 1860s.